Flash Says…

Travelling on the underground: an update

Posted on: 2011-08-04

My last blog post drew a few comments to which I wanted space so I could respond in full. So here we are! Tilly and others, here are my responses to your questions including why I don’t carry the Step Free Guide, why I didn’t know about the maintenance, and so on.

Firstly I should say that Transport for London have called me. They were apologetic and recognised that being unable to access the tube step-free at Paddington in the usual manner kicked off a chain of events which went from bad to worse, which could not have been predicted (a bus driver who trapped me in the door, a taxi driver who blatantly took the piss out of me) but were not acceptable. They have said they will learn lessons from my experience. However, there were some good questions raised by readers…

Why don’t I travel with a copy of the Step Free Guide to hand?

I don’t like the Step Free Guide. It contains lots of information I don’t need. If I’m travelling between two or three stations, on a trip I’ve made several times a year, I don’t need to check the access – it’s only useful when planning a route that you’ve never done before. In terms of carrying a printed copy, it wouldn’t have told me about the maintenance (and I wouldn’t have had room for it in my small under-chair box in which clothes were rolled up and secured with a rubber band and so on to ensure everything fitted neatly – it runs to several pages when printed legibly).

What about using Journey Planner to check your trip beforehand?

What, every time? How about when I travel between one accessible station and another, should I really check that they still exist?

Even the caller from Transport for London agreed that Journey Planner is really aimed at people who don’t know the route they will take, and need to look it up. This doesn’t apply to me as a regular traveller, on a route I’ve taken many times before. And in any case I was visiting my mother’s house where there is no phone signal – I’d have needed to consult Journey Planner before I left London a few days previously – at which point the maintenance hadn’t begun and wouldn’t have shown up when I checked!

Had I known about the maintenance preventing me from accessing the tube at Paddington, I wouldn’t have had many more choices. I could have known in advance about the bus trip, and got going sooner rather than spending time exploring options and then needing to rest. That in turn might have meant I didn’t end up on the tube at a busy time, although as my account shows, the tube (when I could get on it) was the least of my worries.

I couldn’t have prevented the need for the bus trip, but when I realised (earlier that day) that I was exhausted, I could perhaps have rung ahead for a minicab. Then again, who’s to say any of them would have quoted less than £42?

However, it would certainly have helped to know about the maintenance in advance and so I would argue that Transport for London needs to do a better job in that regard.

I think TfL needs to do better with their publicity. The previous week, I’d been on the tube recording a trip for Radio 4. We were particularly paying attention to announcements, signage, advice given etc. and there was nothing warning me that there would be no access to Circle and District lines at Paddington for a month. Similarly on day, other than at Paddington there were no signs and the staff said TfL had given them very little and “most of what you see, we did ourselves”. Later, on the tube part of my journey, which included the circle line, I still didn’t see any signage about this.

Perhaps there also needs to be a more permissive policy about providing black cabs for disabled people who are stuck because of maintenance. Current policy is that where one bus route runs between the closed station and the next accessible station, the traveller should use that. Otherwise, London Underground should lay on a black cab for them. In my case I could get a single bus, but I was then a) exhausted from the act of getting uphill to the bus stop b) running late because the bus takes so long c) travelling through an area I didn’t know, so I wasn’t sure when to get off. If TfL won’t lay on a black cab to the next accessible station then perhaps they should lay on a direct shuttle bus, so nobody has to fret about which bus stop to use or how to know when they’ve arrived, and the travel time isn’t extended by too much.

Like everyone else, disabled people want to travel. Sometimes they won’t know the route and will look it up online, at other times they will be very familiar with the journey and will just set out, expecting to complete it. Wayne Trevor, Accessibility and Inclusion Manager for London Underground told me (for Radio 4) that they expect disabled people to know they will face additional challenges and to plan their journeys, which is fine up to a point. But what if I want to be spontaneous? I could just jump on a tube to join my husband for dinner after work, or to see friends. I live in London and there are certain routes that I travel regularly and would never dream of checking every single time I set out – assuming that I had internet access at the time.

London Underground needs to provide better publicity for their maintenance so that we can avoid getting stuck in the first place, but also a more flexible black cab policy if someone shows up, exhausted and stranded.

Advertisements

4 Responses to "Travelling on the underground: an update"

Why should disabled people have to be prepared for additional challenges? TfL is a transport company, they manage and run public transport. Part of that responsibility is ensuring a full service to all users, including wheelchair users. If they can not provide the service that they normally provide, suitable measures should be taken to make sure that disabled people experience no more inconvenience than any other traveller. When there are concessions available, such as a shuttle bus, or funding for a replacement taxi cab, then they should be easily accessible by those entitled to the service.

It was completely unnecessary for you to go through the nightmare journey you had, TfL SHOULD be learning from it, to make sure it never happens to anyone again.

This is pretty much the reason I gave up travelling in to London. No matter how much planning you do, the system can always find a way to fail you. The last straw for me involved a train that went out of service somewhere in the suburbs I’d never heard of, needing an unplanned underground trip involving more stations I’d never heard of, and when I did get into the central area the line I needed promptly shut down (person under a train), leaving me trapped on a station I didn’t know, planning on the fly which line I should transfer to. And moving to that new line turned out to involve a 20 minute walk and an escalator out of service, with emergency staircase too narrow to actually put both crutches down at once. If I’d had a wheelchair instead of crutches I might have been completely stranded.

Better information isn’t the solution, only making all stations fully accessible will truly make TFL accessible to all. But for the meantime I expect accessibility for the Olympics and particularly the Paralympics to descend into an embarrassing farce.

I believe that we all need to get out there and use public transportation as often as we can to force the system to work.
I have not used public transportation in years because the buses are too dangerous, the attitudes of the passengers and the drivers are bad.
The buses are too unstable to sit down safely
Rather than stay at home, we need to get out there and force the system to work

It did not take over responsibility for the London Underground until 2003 after the controversial PPP contract for maintenance had been agreed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: